busy-on-phone

The feeling of getting school done is very gratifying, especially when you know some people consider it hard, undoable or as something that requires a lot of intelligence.

Funnily enough, after I walked off the stage yesterday, following the handshakes with the SFU President and being handed a ‘pin’ (thank you SFU for the pin… I guess) I decided to take a detour and not go back to my seat.

Why? Well, first I was hungry and second I was bored. I was not paying attention to the speeches, not because the content was not interesting but because the sound system was horrible and the speakers’ charisma was as low as Donald Trump’s ratings.

I met up with my girlfriend and we headed to Starbucks. Since I was wearing a gown, some people were kind to congratulate me. One person asked me how long it took me to graduate.

Me: 5 years. (6 to be exact)

Dude: I’m probably going to take longer than that because I’m not very smart.

Me: It’s not about how smart you are but how well you can cheat.

That was the truth from my perspective. Let us take a look back and see what it takes to graduate.

  • Having a strategy to get into courses when they are only offered once-per-year.
    It means you ought to be up-to-date with what will be offered when and by which instructor.
  • Making friends with the smart people in your classes and partnering up with them for projects.
    Not only you will learn a lot but also guaranteed to get good marks.
  • Sharing “resources” with your friends and even the outsiders on an agreement that they got your back when you need them in another course. You’re going to come across a few losers here.
  • Finally, having a sense of resilience and endurance to get the tedious work done.

Does that require a lot of intelligence? Good question and the answer is no. Little bit of EQ, also known as, emotional intelligence or street smarts is all you need to cross off 3 of the 4 steps above.

And… that is exactly the problem with our education system. Students are getting evaluated based on their performance on temporary memorization of selective information. Then there is group projects where there is often one or two load bearers who carry the project to completion.

Great Amid. What are you going to do about it?

I am writing about it and most importantly talking about it. Sooner than later, we are going to realize this education system is broken. Learning does not happen in classrooms but in action. This is extremely true when the prospect of getting a job is no longer relevant to your education.

With that in mind, I can only hope for a better education system for our nephews, nieces and children or maybe none at all!

 

PHOTO: I’M BUSY ON THE PHONE. TAKEN WITH IPHONE AT SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY, BURNABY, BC, CANADA

 

Would you like to discuss…

  • how we can improve the education system?
  • if education system is where it needs to be?
  • if I ever cheated at school?

Feel free to message me on LinkedIn or contact me through this website.